Law Office of Christopher K. Steuart

Law Office of Christopher K. Steuart

About Us


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 Christopher K. Steuart is an   attorney licensed in Washington State and the U. S. District Court for the Western District of Washington and the U. S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit.  

 Formerly he was a computer forensic examiner for Boeing. 

 He was an Electronic Warfare Officer and Special Security Officer in the United States Army and Army  Reserve.          

 He has presented extensively in continuing  legal education seminars at regional, national and international forums.

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My practice is focused on representing people injured by pharmaceuticals, and especially Reglan®  (generically identified as metoclopramide).

I am looking for new clients who have suffered injuries from long-term (in excess of 12 weeks) use of metoclopramide.

My practice is associated with Medical Legal Consultants of Washington on several metoclopramide injury cases.

I am currently working on a metoclopramide case advancing to trial in October 2017 in Grays Harbor County.  

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I am working with the most experienced Reglan® plaintiffs' attorney in Washington State.  If you have been injured by Reglan®  or metoclopramide, and you want the bring in the team that knows Reglan®, the facts, issues, the manufacturers, and the tactics required to move your case forward, call 206-293-4377 or email chris@steuartlawoffice.com .

 When you make initial contact, please mention that you may have been injured by Reglan®  or metoclopramide.

Contact Us


Drop us a line!

Law Office of Christopher K. Steuart

5355 204th Place NE, Redmond, Washington 98053

(206) 293-4377

Hours

By appointment only.

FAQs

  What are some of the side effects of Reglan?

  • Tardive dyskinesia (abnormal muscle movements). 
  • Uncontrolled spasms of your face and neck muscles, or muscles of your body, arms, and legs (dystonia). These muscle spasms  can cause abnormal movements and body positions. These spasms usually  start within the first 2 days of treatment. These spasms happen more  often in children and adults under age 30.
  • Depression, thoughts about suicide, and suicide. Some people who take REGLAN become depressed. You may have thoughts about hurting or killing yourself. Some people who take Reglan have ended their own lives (suicide).
  • Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome (NMS). NMS is a very rare but very serious condition that can happen with Reglan. NMS can cause death and must be treated in a hospital. Symptoms of NMS include: high fever, stiff muscles, problems thinking, very fast or uneven heartbeat, and increased sweating.
  • Parkinsonism. Symptoms include slight shaking, body stiffness, trouble moving or keeping your balance. If you already have Parkinson's disease, your symptoms may become worse while you are receiving REGLAN.

Call your doctor and get medical help right away if you:  

  • feel depressed or have thoughts about hurting or killing yourself
  • have high fever, stiff muscles, problems thinking, very fast or uneven heartbeat, and increased sweating
  • have muscle movements you cannot stop or control
  • have muscle movements that are new or unusual

Common side effects of Reglan include:  

  • feeling restless, sleepy, tired, dizzy, or exhausted
  • headache
  • confusion
  • trouble sleeping

You may have more side effects the longer you take REGLAN and the more REGLAN you take. You may still have side effects after stopping REGLAN. You may have symptoms from stopping (withdrawal) REGLAN such as headaches, and feeling dizzy or nervous.   See http://www.rxlist.com/reglan-drug/medication-guide.htm

What is Patient Informed Consent In Washington State?  

RCW 7.70.030  Propositions required to be established—Burden of proof.

No  award shall be made in any action or arbitration for damages for injury  occurring as the result of health care which is provided after June 25,  1976, unless the plaintiff establishes one or more of the following  propositions:(1) That injury resulted from the failure of a health care provider to follow the accepted standard of care;(2) That a health care provider promised the patient or his or her representative that the injury suffered would not occur;(3) That injury resulted from health care to which the patient or his or her representative did not consent.  .  .  .

What does Tardive Dyskinesia look like?

 The symptoms of tardive dyskinesia often resemble Tourette’s syndrome  or Parkinson’s disease. People with Tardive Dyskinesia have difficulty  controlling their bodies and are prone to random, repetitive movements  that can be mild or physically disabling. 

  Physical symptoms include:     Grimacing Tongue protrusion   Lip smacking Lip puckering or pursing   Rapid eye blinking Rapid movements of the trunk, legs and arms   Random movements of the fingers Random movements of the toes   Difficulty breathing Grunting and gasping    

Doctors use the Abnormal Involuntary Movement Scale (AIMS) to rate  symptom severity. Movements are scored on a scale of 0 (none) to 4  (severe), and there are a total of 12 items that correspond to each part  of the face and body.   See https://www.drugwatch.com/tardive-dyskinesia/

View one or more of these videos:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W_3bbpFjI68

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TqXN7oLVq9M

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LwOenqY3p0E

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BRbjRctgj_k                   

Could I have tardive dyskinesia and my doctor not have diagnosed it?   Most doctors have very limited experience with tardive dyskinesia and other side effects of metoclopramide, and unless they have specific training in movement disorders they can miss the diagnosis or misdiagnose the condition.                                        

  What does Reglan do?   

    Reglan (metoclopramide) increases muscle contractions in the upper digestive tract. This speeds up the rate at which the stomach empties into the intestines. Reglan is used short-term to treat heartburn caused by gastroesophageal reflux in people who have used other medications without relief of symptoms. Reglan may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. 

What is Important to Know about Reglan? NEVER TAKE REGLAN IN LARGER AMOUNTS THAN RECOMMENDED, OR FOR LONGER THAN 12 WEEKS. High doses or long-term use of Reglan can cause a serious movement disorder that may not be reversible. Symptoms of this disorder include uncontrollable muscle movements of your lips, tongue, eyes, face, arms, or legs. The longer you take Reglan, the more likely you are to develop a serious movement disorder. The risk of this side effect is higher in women, diabetics, and older adults. You should not take Reglan if you are allergic to metoclopramide, or if you have bleeding or blockage in your stomach or intestines, epilepsy or other seizure disorder, or an adrenal gland tumor (pheochromocytoma). Before you take Reglan, tell your doctor if you have kidney or liver disease, congestive heart failure, high blood pressure, diabetes, Parkinson's disease, or a history of depression. Do not drink alcohol. It can increase some of the side effects of Reglan. There are many other medicines that can interact with Reglan. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor. Keep a list of all your medicines and show it to any healthcare provider who treats you. Stop using Reglan and call your doctor at once if you have tremors or uncontrolled muscle movements, fever, stiff muscles, confusion, sweating, fast or uneven heartbeats, rapid breathing, depressed mood, thoughts of suicide or hurting yourself, hallucinations, anxiety, agitation, seizure, or jaundice (yellowing of your skin or eyes).   See https://www.drugs.com/reglan.html  

What does the FDA say about Reglan/metoclopramide and Nervous System Disorders?

 For Immediate Release Feb. 26, 2009   FDA Requires Boxed Warning and Risk Mitigation Strategy for Metoclopramide-Containing Drugs

Agency warns against chronic use of these products to treat gastrointestinal disorders

The  U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced today that manufacturers of  metoclopramide, a drug used to treat gastrointestinal disorders, must  add a boxed warning to their drug labels about the risk of its long-term  or high-dose use. Chronic use of metoclopramide has been linked to  tardive dyskinesia, which may include involuntary and repetitive  movements of the body, even after the drugs are no longer taken.Manufacturers  will be required to implement a risk evaluation and mitigation  strategy, or REMS, to ensure patients are provided with a medication  guide that discusses this risk.The FDA wants patients and health  care professionals to know about this risk so they can make informed  decisions about treatment, said Janet Woodcock, M.D., director of the  FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. The chronic use of  metoclopramide therapy should be avoided in all but rare cases where the  benefit is believed to outweigh the risk.Current product  labeling warns of the risk of tardive dyskinesia with chronic  metoclopramide treatment. The development of this condition is directly  related to the length of time a patient is taking metoclopramide and the  number of doses taken. Those at greatest risk include the elderly,  especially older women, and people who have been on the drug for a long  time.Tardive dyskinesia is characterized by involuntary,  repetitive movements of the extremities, or lip smacking, grimacing,  tongue protrusion, rapid eye movements or blinking, puckering and  pursing of the lips, or impaired movement of the fingers. These symptoms  are rarely reversible and there is no known treatment. However, in some  patients, symptoms may lessen or resolve after metoclopramide treatment  is stopped.Metoclopramide works by speeding up the movement of  the stomach muscles, thus increasing the rate at which the stomach  empties into the intestines. It is used as a short-term treatment of  gastroesophageal reflux disease in patients who have not responded to  other therapies, and to treat diabetic gastroparesis (slowed emptying of  the stomach's contents into the intestines). It is recommended that  treatment not exceed three months.Metoclopramide is available in a  variety of formulations including tablets, syrups and injections. Names  of metoclopramide-containing products include Reglan Tablets, Reglan  Oral Disintegrating Tablets, Metoclopramide Oral Solution, and Reglan  Injection. More than two million Americans use these products.Recently  published analyses suggest that metoclopramide is the most common cause  of drug-induced movement disorders. Another analysis of study data by  the FDA showed that about 20 percent of patients in that study who used  metoclopramide took it for longer than three months. The FDA has also  become aware of continued spontaneous reports of tardive dyskinesia in  patients who used metoclopramide, the majority of whom had taken the  drug for more than three months.Consumers and health care  professionals are encouraged to report adverse events to the FDA's  MedWatch program at 800-FDA-1088, by mail at MedWatch, HF-2, FDA, 5600  Fishers Lane, Rockville, Md. 20852-9787, or online.For information about REMS see: Public Law 110-85         See http://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/2009/ucm149533.htm     See video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IEcuDRl0a3w&list=PLGtuQdX5oTrAx09DIQJGUWj2KurGj_NI9&index=2

FAQs

  What are some of the side effects of Reglan?

  • Tardive dyskinesia (abnormal muscle movements). 
  • Uncontrolled spasms of your face and neck muscles, or muscles of your body, arms, and legs (dystonia). These muscle spasms  can cause abnormal movements and body positions. These spasms usually  start within the first 2 days of treatment. These spasms happen more  often in children and adults under age 30.
  • Depression, thoughts about suicide, and suicide. Some people who take REGLAN become depressed. You may have thoughts about hurting or killing yourself. Some people who take Reglan have ended their own lives (suicide).
  • Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome (NMS). NMS is a very rare but very serious condition that can happen with Reglan. NMS can cause death and must be treated in a hospital. Symptoms of NMS include: high fever, stiff muscles, problems thinking, very fast or uneven heartbeat, and increased sweating.
  • Parkinsonism. Symptoms include slight shaking, body stiffness, trouble moving or keeping your balance. If you already have Parkinson's disease, your symptoms may become worse while you are receiving REGLAN.

Call your doctor and get medical help right away if you:  

  • feel depressed or have thoughts about hurting or killing yourself
  • have high fever, stiff muscles, problems thinking, very fast or uneven heartbeat, and increased sweating
  • have muscle movements you cannot stop or control
  • have muscle movements that are new or unusual

Common side effects of Reglan include:  

  • feeling restless, sleepy, tired, dizzy, or exhausted
  • headache
  • confusion
  • trouble sleeping

You may have more side effects the longer you take REGLAN and the more REGLAN you take. You may still have side effects after stopping REGLAN. You may have symptoms from stopping (withdrawal) REGLAN such as headaches, and feeling dizzy or nervous.   See http://www.rxlist.com/reglan-drug/medication-guide.htm

What is Patient Informed Consent In Washington State?  

RCW 7.70.030  Propositions required to be established—Burden of proof.

No  award shall be made in any action or arbitration for damages for injury  occurring as the result of health care which is provided after June 25,  1976, unless the plaintiff establishes one or more of the following  propositions:(1) That injury resulted from the failure of a health care provider to follow the accepted standard of care;(2) That a health care provider promised the patient or his or her representative that the injury suffered would not occur;(3) That injury resulted from health care to which the patient or his or her representative did not consent.  .  .  .

What does Tardive Dyskinesia look like?

 The symptoms of tardive dyskinesia often resemble Tourette’s syndrome  or Parkinson’s disease. People with Tardive Dyskinesia have difficulty  controlling their bodies and are prone to random, repetitive movements  that can be mild or physically disabling. 

  Physical symptoms include:     Grimacing Tongue protrusion   Lip smacking Lip puckering or pursing   Rapid eye blinking Rapid movements of the trunk, legs and arms   Random movements of the fingers Random movements of the toes   Difficulty breathing Grunting and gasping    

Doctors use the Abnormal Involuntary Movement Scale (AIMS) to rate  symptom severity. Movements are scored on a scale of 0 (none) to 4  (severe), and there are a total of 12 items that correspond to each part  of the face and body.   See https://www.drugwatch.com/tardive-dyskinesia/

View one or more of these videos:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W_3bbpFjI68

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TqXN7oLVq9M

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LwOenqY3p0E

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BRbjRctgj_k                   

Could I have tardive dyskinesia and my doctor not have diagnosed it?   Most doctors have very limited experience with tardive dyskinesia and other side effects of metoclopramide, and unless they have specific training in movement disorders they can miss the diagnosis or misdiagnose the condition.                                        

  What does Reglan do?   

    Reglan (metoclopramide) increases muscle contractions in the upper digestive tract. This speeds up the rate at which the stomach empties into the intestines. Reglan is used short-term to treat heartburn caused by gastroesophageal reflux in people who have used other medications without relief of symptoms. Reglan may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. 

What is Important to Know about Reglan? NEVER TAKE REGLAN IN LARGER AMOUNTS THAN RECOMMENDED, OR FOR LONGER THAN 12 WEEKS. High doses or long-term use of Reglan can cause a serious movement disorder that may not be reversible. Symptoms of this disorder include uncontrollable muscle movements of your lips, tongue, eyes, face, arms, or legs. The longer you take Reglan, the more likely you are to develop a serious movement disorder. The risk of this side effect is higher in women, diabetics, and older adults. You should not take Reglan if you are allergic to metoclopramide, or if you have bleeding or blockage in your stomach or intestines, epilepsy or other seizure disorder, or an adrenal gland tumor (pheochromocytoma). Before you take Reglan, tell your doctor if you have kidney or liver disease, congestive heart failure, high blood pressure, diabetes, Parkinson's disease, or a history of depression. Do not drink alcohol. It can increase some of the side effects of Reglan. There are many other medicines that can interact with Reglan. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor. Keep a list of all your medicines and show it to any healthcare provider who treats you. Stop using Reglan and call your doctor at once if you have tremors or uncontrolled muscle movements, fever, stiff muscles, confusion, sweating, fast or uneven heartbeats, rapid breathing, depressed mood, thoughts of suicide or hurting yourself, hallucinations, anxiety, agitation, seizure, or jaundice (yellowing of your skin or eyes).   See https://www.drugs.com/reglan.html  

What does the FDA say about Reglan/metoclopramide and Nervous System Disorders?

 For Immediate Release Feb. 26, 2009   FDA Requires Boxed Warning and Risk Mitigation Strategy for Metoclopramide-Containing Drugs

Agency warns against chronic use of these products to treat gastrointestinal disorders

The  U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced today that manufacturers of  metoclopramide, a drug used to treat gastrointestinal disorders, must  add a boxed warning to their drug labels about the risk of its long-term  or high-dose use. Chronic use of metoclopramide has been linked to  tardive dyskinesia, which may include involuntary and repetitive  movements of the body, even after the drugs are no longer taken.Manufacturers  will be required to implement a risk evaluation and mitigation  strategy, or REMS, to ensure patients are provided with a medication  guide that discusses this risk.The FDA wants patients and health  care professionals to know about this risk so they can make informed  decisions about treatment, said Janet Woodcock, M.D., director of the  FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. The chronic use of  metoclopramide therapy should be avoided in all but rare cases where the  benefit is believed to outweigh the risk.Current product  labeling warns of the risk of tardive dyskinesia with chronic  metoclopramide treatment. The development of this condition is directly  related to the length of time a patient is taking metoclopramide and the  number of doses taken. Those at greatest risk include the elderly,  especially older women, and people who have been on the drug for a long  time.Tardive dyskinesia is characterized by involuntary,  repetitive movements of the extremities, or lip smacking, grimacing,  tongue protrusion, rapid eye movements or blinking, puckering and  pursing of the lips, or impaired movement of the fingers. These symptoms  are rarely reversible and there is no known treatment. However, in some  patients, symptoms may lessen or resolve after metoclopramide treatment  is stopped.Metoclopramide works by speeding up the movement of  the stomach muscles, thus increasing the rate at which the stomach  empties into the intestines. It is used as a short-term treatment of  gastroesophageal reflux disease in patients who have not responded to  other therapies, and to treat diabetic gastroparesis (slowed emptying of  the stomach's contents into the intestines). It is recommended that  treatment not exceed three months.Metoclopramide is available in a  variety of formulations including tablets, syrups and injections. Names  of metoclopramide-containing products include Reglan Tablets, Reglan  Oral Disintegrating Tablets, Metoclopramide Oral Solution, and Reglan  Injection. More than two million Americans use these products.Recently  published analyses suggest that metoclopramide is the most common cause  of drug-induced movement disorders. Another analysis of study data by  the FDA showed that about 20 percent of patients in that study who used  metoclopramide took it for longer than three months. The FDA has also  become aware of continued spontaneous reports of tardive dyskinesia in  patients who used metoclopramide, the majority of whom had taken the  drug for more than three months.Consumers and health care  professionals are encouraged to report adverse events to the FDA's  MedWatch program at 800-FDA-1088, by mail at MedWatch, HF-2, FDA, 5600  Fishers Lane, Rockville, Md. 20852-9787, or online.For information about REMS see: Public Law 110-85         See http://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/2009/ucm149533.htm     See video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IEcuDRl0a3w&list=PLGtuQdX5oTrAx09DIQJGUWj2KurGj_NI9&index=2

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